Lark. 22. Music and History double major. Girl Scout. INFP.
Reblogged from katokeeffe  2,724 notes

I love bookshelves, and stacks of books, spines, typography, and the feel of pages between my fingertips. I love bookmarks, and old bindings, and stars in margins next to beautiful passages. I love exuberant underlinings that recall to me a swoon of language-love from a long-ago reading, something I hoped to remember. I love book plates, and inscriptions in gifts from loved ones, I love author signatures, and I love books sitting around reminding me of them, being present in my life, being. I love books. Not just for what they contain. I love them as objects too, as ever-present reminders of what they contain, and because they are beautiful. They are one of my favorite things in life, really at the tiptop of the list, easily my favorite inanimate things in existence, and … I am just not cottoning on to this idea of making them … not exist anymore. Making them cease to take up space in the world, in my life? No, please do not take away the physical reality of my books. By Laini Taylor (via littledallilasbookshelf)

Reblogged from capitalswan  70,751 notes

otakusapien:

superqueerpasta:

scaredpotter:

how many people would worship and glorify umbridge if she wasn’t a woman and played by a moderately good-looking man 

as terrible as snape was, umbridge

  • ran the muggle-born registration commission
  • drafted anti-werewolf legislation
  • ordered a Dementor attack on two teenagers, one of whom was a muggle
  • politically restricted Hogwarts’s curriculum
  • punished students with Blood Quills, leaving them scarred
  • banned students’ access to unbiased news sources
  • read and censored students’ mail

snape was awful and deeply flawed, but umbridge was straight-up evil.

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.


yeah… I assumed Alex was the boy because he’s closer to the words, “Alex” is directly above him, and he’s taking a strong stance whereas the girl is bent backwards and I didn’t see her right away.

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

yeah… I assumed Alex was the boy because he’s closer to the words, “Alex” is directly above him, and he’s taking a strong stance whereas the girl is bent backwards and I didn’t see her right away.

Reblogged from pinoleraaa  664,307 notes

me-loving-you:

dynastylnoire:

mediapathic:

nextyearsgirl:

This is an enormous chain and I’m sorry, but I need to say this:

The laws in the Old Testament were set forth by god as the rules the Hebrews needed to follow in order to be righteous, to atone for the sin of Adam and Eve and to be able to get into Heaven. That is also why they were required to make sacrifices, because it was part of the appeasement for Original Sin.

According to Christian theology, when Jesus came from Heaven, it was for the express purpose of sacrificing himself on the cross so that our sins may be forgiven. His sacrifice was supposed to be the ultimate act that would free us from the former laws and regulations and allow us to enter Heaven by acting in his image. That is why he said “it is finished” when he died on the cross. That is why Christians don’t have to circumcise their sons (god’s covenant with Jacob), that is why they don’t have to perform animal sacrifice, or grow out their forelocks, or follow any of the other laws of Leviticus.

When you quote Leviticus as god’s law and say they are rules we must follow because they are what god or Jesus wants us to do, what you are really saying, as a Christian, is that Christ’s sacrifice on the cross was invalid. He died in vain because you believe we are still beholden to the old laws. That is what you, a self-professed good Christian, are saying to your god and his son, that their plan for your salvation wasn’t good enough for you.

So maybe actually read the thing before you start quoting it, because the implications of your actions go a lot deeper than you think.

This is a theological point that doesn’t come up often enough.

^^^^^^^^^^^^

This could help a lot of people.